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Web Blast: Handgun Ammo

More Flavors Than The Candy Palace — And
Better In A Gunfight Than A Gooseberry Gum Drop!

By John Connor

From The March/April 2011 Issue Of American Handgunner

Handgun Ammo 1

Handgun Ammo 2

His Most Immenseness Roy-Boy said, Don’t forget the rimfires! – and since I know what
he’s been doing in his new backyard (backwoods, really) I won’t forget. It’s something to
do with .22’s and acorns at extended ranges. Well, CCI’s got a raft of rimfire rounds, from
their zippy Stinger copper-plated hollowpoints, left, to precision competition rounds, and
at right, something for everyone who tap-dances through rattler country: shot-loaded snake
rounds, a must-have item. www.cci-ammunition.com

Handgun Ammo 3

So, how much does our own Clint Smith like Cor-Bon’s DPX rounds? Enough
that he puts his own Thunder Ranch logo on the box. I’d say that’s a pretty
strong endorsement of DPX’s deep penetration and bucket-like expansion,
not to mention consistent accuracy and sheer zip… www.cor-bon.com

Handgun Ammo 4

Whether it’s spanky-new or highest-quality remanufactured ammunition, Black Hills has
earned a solid reputation for quality, reliability, and undeniable accuracy. For you .45 ACP
shooters who insist on nothin’ but those famous red boxes, take note of the new 185-grain
Barnes Tac-XP+P loading in addition to their established 185-grain JHP, 230-grain JHP and
230-grain FMJ rounds – because it looks like they’ve got another winner! www.black-hills.com

Handgun Ammo 5

From their origin, Extreme Shock ammunition has been designed for critical
use in sensitive environments. The AFR – Air Freedom Round – for example,
uses a NyTrilium slug at +P pressures for deadly effect, yet it will break up on
hard surfaces, not penetrating the skin of most commercial aircraft or a typical
aluminum airline seatback. The AFR will also fragment in half-inch sheet rock
wallboard, making it a very safe round for home defense. See the lineup at
www.extremeshockusa.com.

Handgun Ammo 6

Winchester says their new Supreme Elite Dual Bond ammo is “suitable for whitetail
deer to large dangerous game, such as brown bear,” but we’re thinkin’ “also suitable
for moving vans, vampires and low-flying Chinese bombers.” Made in 454 Casull,
460 Smith & Wesson and the dragon-slayin’ 500 Smith & Wesson, Dual Bond slugs
are “a bullet within a bullet” design incorporating twelve expanding segments,
producing dramatic stopping power and massive tissue damage. Check them
out at www.winchester.com.

Handgun Ammo 7

For over thirty years, Cor-Bon’s Glaser Safety Slug has been a superior choice
in personal defense ammo in urban settings, close quarters and thin-walled
environments of all kinds. A thin, frangible skin and soft polymer tip holds
compressed lead shot so the round will break up easily with minimal ricochet
or penetration, yet create enormous soft-tissue wound channels and expend
all of its energy in a quick, controlled manner. Accuracy is excellent, and
recoil is very low, allowing fast follow-up shots. Read all the tech-specs on
Glaser Blue and Glaser Silver at www.cor-bon.com.

Handgun Ammo 7

Handgun Ammo 8

Randy Garrett’s commentaries on bears, bullets and ballistics should be required
reading for anyone wandering into bear country, or intent on hunting big bruins.
Determined to provide the best possible rounds in .44 Magnum and .45-70 Government
for use on dangerous game, Garrett has become a walking encyclopedia of simple, sound
and structured knowledge – and his knowledge has paid off for many, many hunters,
including those who weren’t hunting bears, but were being hunted by them. Left to
right are his 310-grain and 330-grain SuperHardCast Hammerhead .44 Magnum
and .44 Mag +P rounds. When lesser ammo might mean you’ll be Yogi’s lunch,
Hammerheads can get you home. www.garrettcartridges.com

So what do you think? “Golden Age” stuff, ain’t it? Stand at ease, Captain Bob; looks
like I won’t be eatin’ your hat – or mine – very soon, huh? Kwaheri! ~Connor~

March/April 2010

Order Your Copy Of The March/April 2010 Issue Today!

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