more gunsmithing!

16

As a revolver enthusiast, I very much enjoyed your article on revolver timing. The article was easily understood, and the illustrations made it even better. Although I’m a revolver fan, I’m also interested in semi-automatic handguns and all types of rifles. I would like to see future articles of a technical nature. I read each issue of American Handgunner and Guns from cover to cover — several times over. Great publications!

Robert Brown
Via emai

More On Gunsmithing

Please keep the gunsmithing topic going. I really appreciate the expertise and efforts of the crew at all the FMG publications.
Thanks,
Carl
Via email


I was coming to the end of Roy Huntington’s article on revolver timing, already thinking to myself this was the best single article I had ever read on how a revolver works. There are few people who have genuine expertise and experience and can convey what they know in good English, painting a clear word picture for the reader who is eager to learn. Roy Huntington is, without a doubt, one of those few. Then, at the very end of the article, he asks if I would like him to “write more on this sort of thing.” Heck, yes!
Kudos and thanks,
Brant Bassett
Via email


I especially enjoyed the Roy Huntington article about revolver timing. Please continue to include such articles.
Thanks,
Mike Sanders
Via email

Ayoob Files

I’ve just received my Nov/Dec issue. As always, I thumbed straight through to the Ayoob Files. Massad Ayoob has been one of my favorite gun writers for decades (more than I care to admit). “The Larry Goldstein Incident” made me realize that my habit of carrying everywhere but at my work will stand me in good stead. My employer will not allow me to carry at work. That doesn’t mean I’m totally unarmed, just no gun. But when I arrive home, my full sized 1911 goes into an IWB holster and placed on my side with a spare magazine of Gold Dot personal protection .45 ACP in a mag carrier. I’m a 75-year-old Vietnam vet, and I haven’t been totally unarmed since December 30, 1968. And like Clyde Berry, I carried a .45 everywhere in the Nam. I, too, slept with it.

I intend to keep reading your great mag! Y’all keep up the good work, ya hear?
Harold E. Shank SSG USA (Ret.)
Via email

Snakes On A Plane

I always feel like Duke is a kindred spirit and greatly enjoy his articles. As a Southeastern Okie I had considerable experience with venomous reptiles, mostly cottonmouths. I patrolled our swampy ranch and attribute head shooting (only poisonous) snakes to developing my handgun skill.

There is one advantage to shot shells which I have never heard Duke mention. It probably doesn’t apply in his area.
Some people say you should be able to hit the snake with a regular bullet. But if you fail to account for the sight change at close range you will hit under the snake. In the wet clay of the South a .44 Magnum can elevate a snake to surprising heights. An airborne snake is an exciting thing to behold. But they do not seem to like flight and tend to land agitated.
David
Via email

Snakes On A Plane

I always feel like Duke is a kindred spirit and greatly enjoy his articles. As a Southeastern Okie I had considerable experience with venomous reptiles, mostly cottonmouths. I patrolled our swampy ranch and attribute head shooting (only poisonous) snakes to developing my handgun skill.

There is one advantage to shot shells which I have never heard Duke mention. It probably doesn’t apply in his area.
Some people say you should be able to hit the snake with a regular bullet. But if you fail to account for the sight change at close range you will hit under the snake. In the wet clay of the South a .44 Magnum can elevate a snake to surprising heights. An airborne snake is an exciting thing to behold. But they do not seem to like flight and tend to land agitated.
David
Via email

Got Squires?

I get a lot of gun magazines regularly but yours is the best of the best, honest. Almost every issue has test firings on new or different handguns each month. The shooter fires off hundreds of rounds during these tests.
My questions are, who the hell loads all those magazines, what does he use to do it and where are you able to get all that ammo? Us mere mortals can hardly find a box of 9mm, or most other pistol caliber, anywhere in town or online lately. My fingers get sore real quick filling up my meager batch of mags. Although I did recently buy a Maglula loader that seem to help a lot. Just a curious soul looking for answers.
Thanks for all your good insightful articles and for having a great writing staff of experts.
Bob
Via email

As much as some people may believe we’ve got ammo bearers, squires, and more staff than White House First Ladies, the ugly truth is we do all the grunt work ourselves. Setting up, taking pictures, loading magazines, and … cleaning guns! With all the ammo hoarding going on, we’re also having a tough time sourcing ammo, and are relying on rapidly depleting existing supplies. Unfortunately, we don’t have any secrets to share about National Ammo Treasure burial sites. On the other hand, if you know anyone who wants an ammo bearer job, let us know. The work is dirty and thankless, but at least the pay is … zero! — Tom

Vote Dangit!

We gun folks keep saying the phrase in Workman’s article, words to the effect of “they just don’t get it…” It being the ineffectiveness of laws against guns.

Unfortunately for us, they DO get it! They’re not stupid; they realize criminals, terrorists, madmen, thugs, etc. can and will get guns anytime they want. They’re paid to promote the “guns are unsafe, guns are the problem” mantra. There’s a programmed, concerted effort to disarm and subjugate the American public.

I would suggest we stop repeating our mantra and start encouraging our sympathetic audience to get involved. Vote, knock on doors for candidates in your neighborhood, attend local government meetings, and speak up to the press and media. We cannot afford to be “the silent majority” any longer! It’s clear in this election that outright confiscation of firearms is on the table.
Respectfully,
Paul W. Betz
Via email

We are indeed living in dangerous times and it’s not just because of COVID-19 or the much reported civil unrest we’re witnessing, but rather it’s the fact another election is looming in November and it’s never been easier for the anti-gun and anti-hunting politician’s to get elected or re-elected. The main reason is gun owners and hunters have been complacent and apathetic when it comes to getting out and voting for their gun/hunting rights/heritage. One only needs to look at what happened in Virginia and what is continuing to unfold there. This should be a harsh lesson of what happens when there’s a low voter turnout. In Virginia, only around 40% of the eligible voters turned out to vote. This indeed could happen nationwide. We’re in danger of losing our gun rights and hunting heritage if we fail to act and get out and vote this November and every election from here on out. Dangerous times? Not if we all do our part to regain our gun rights and hunting heritage and vote.
Daniel W. Quarry
Via email

Customer Service

I just wanted to drop a quick note to you about one of your advertisers, Versacarry. Without going into too much detail, I just had a great experience with their customer service department. Steven in particular went above and beyond to take care of a minor issue that had to be resolved. I take my hat off to them.
Thanks,
Rhinohunter
Via email

Guncrank Diaries 2.0

I’m nearly finished with this month’s American Handgunner, but I could wait no longer to congratulate Will Dabbs, MD on his excellent writing.

As a military veteran and Vietnam Vet (1966-1967) I can relate fully to Dr. Dabbs’ article on birthdays. Dr. Dabbs’ reveries stirred memories of care packages, bits of pogue bait and other memorandums from back in “The World,” and indeed the “spiritual anchor” of a great set of parents waiting for my return. That bit of writing excellence was then succeeded by his Love Story. Seldom, if ever, have I seen an explanation of the word “Love” explained so succinctly, and on such a broad emotional landscape.

The 5.7 x 28mm FN Five-seveN so stirred the soul that after its introduction by FN, no less an icon than Tom Clancy used it as the weapon of choice. Quite the tool. Although I have a full complement of firearms, and lack only the time to shoot them all, I want a Ruger-57. I don’t need one, but I want one. I hope Dr. Dabbs gets a commission off each and every Ruger-57 sold. He deserves it. Tell him “thanks” for me and please ask him to keep up the good work.
Sincerely,
Hal
Via email

When Dr. Will Dabbs wrote a probationary piece for Guncrank Diaries I thought that he might be a decent stand-in for Connor. After reading “Free To Good Home” about “Dog” in the July/August edition I hereby proclaim the good doctor to be a worthy successor! The last couple of paragraphs got kind of blurry as I remembered the mixed breed, part-beagle who did more for me than I did for him as he worked for 16 years to make me a better human being.
Well done, Dr. Will!!
Richard D. Huddle
Via email

More Specs Please

I couldn’t help but notice as good and informative as your reviews on pistols are, they don’t mention prices unless the numbers are in secret code. I can only assume you’re applying the rule, “if you have to ask you can’t afford it.” I also prefer a format that gives the statistics from weight, trigger pull, etc. Other than those minor issues I love your magazine.
Roger Wilson
Via email

Purchase A PDF Download Of The American Handgunner Jan/Feb 2021 Issue Now!